pieces of string

powells:

Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Nobel Prize-winning Colombian novelist, died today. He was 87. http://powells.us/1qQFL4r
Apr 17

powells:

Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Nobel Prize-winning Colombian novelist, died today. He was 87. http://powells.us/1qQFL4r

(via mchakrabarti)

Apr 15

loverofbeauty:

Adam Magyar:  Stainless - Sindorim, Seoul (excerpt)

(Source: vimeo.com)

Apr 15

Kevin Spacey in 1999.

(Source: st4nl3yb4ldwin, via b-flat-minor)

Apr 14

Tweens. “Forever.”

Apr 14

Zac Efron at the MTV Movie Awards 2014.

(Source: stiles-stlinski, via mchakrabarti)

Apr 13

austenchanted:

what are men compared to rocks and mountains?

(via volumexii)

"The English “please” is short for “if you please,” “if it pleases you to do this” — it is the same in most European languages (French s’il vous plait, Spanish por favor). Its literal meaning is “you are under no obligation to do this.” “Hand me the salt. Not that I am saying that you have to!” This is not true; there is a social obligation, and it would be almost impossible not to comply. But etiquette largely consists of the exchange of polite fictions (to use less polite language, lies). When you ask someone to pass the salt, you are also giving them an order; by attaching the word “please,” you are saying that it is not an order. But, in fact, it is. In English, “thank you” derives from “think;” it originally meant, “I will remember what you did for me” — which is usually not true either — but in other languages (the Portuguese obrigado is a good example) the standard term follows the form of the English “much obliged” — it actually does means “I am in your debt.” The French merci is even more graphic: it derives from “mercy,” as in begging for mercy; by saying it you are symbolically placing yourself in your benefactor’s power — since a debtor is, after all, a criminal. Saying “you’re welcome,” or “it’s nothing” (French de rien, Spanish de nada) — the latter has at least the advantage of often being literally true — is a way of reassuring the one to whom one has passed the salt that you are not actually inscribing a debit in your imaginary moral account book. So is saying “my pleasure” — you are saying, “No, actually, it’s a credit, not a debit — you did me a favor because in asking me to pass the salt, you gave me the opportunity to do something I found rewarding in itself!” …"

- David Graeber in Debt: The First 5,000 Years (via mongoosenamedt)

(via volumexii)

Apr 13
loverofbeauty:

from Little Poems in Prose -  Charles Baudelaire, trans. by Aleister Crowley, 1928
Apr 13

loverofbeauty:

from Little Poems in Prose -  Charles Baudelaire, trans. by Aleister Crowley, 1928

(Source: lookinginliterature)

beshitted:

anagrammaton:

knuckle tats say FOUC AULT

knuck tats saying POST, and on the other hand, having transcended the limitations of the form, STRUCTURALIST

(via ph7soymilk)

Apr 12
Apr 12

musicalandacademicblunderings:

lovelyprincessdiana:

This will forever be my favorite thing

Adorable.

(Source: georgesus)

Apr 11

(Source: ex0ticvibess, via b-flat-minor)

Apr 9

wetheurban:

ART: Abstract Geometric Reflections by Victoria Siemer

Don’t you just love good design work? Victoria Siemer, also know as Witchoria, is a graphic designer hailing from Brooklyn, New York.

Read More

(via npr)

Apr 8

(Source: betype, via mchakrabarti)

Apr 6

caravaggista:

Details from John Singer Sargent’s incredible portraits of:

Lady Helen Vincent, Viscountess d’Abernon (1904), Mrs. Cecil Wade (1886),Mrs. Joshua Montgomery Sears (Sarah Choate Sears) (1899), Madame X (Madame Pierre Gautreau)(1883–84), andElizabeth Winthrop Chanler (Mrs. John Jay Chapman) (1893)

(via b-flat-minor)

Apr 5

dappledwithshadow:

Gustave Courbet (French, 1819-1877)

(via b-flat-minor)